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Project Information

Table of Contents

  1. Project Options and Requirements
  2. Common Requirements
  3. Project Options
  4. Team Roles
  5. Artifact Document Templates
  6. Sprint Information
    1. Sprint 1: Project Organization
    2. Sprint 2: Requirements Elicitation
    3. Sprint 3: Login Integration
    4. Sprint 4: API Integration + Major Feature
    5. Sprint 5: Next Major Feature
    6. Sprint 6: Beta Version
  7. Final Grading Information

Project Options and Requirements

Your team must choose one of these project options. You have a great deal of agency within these options, but you must stick to the core use cases of the project.

You must meet any common and project specific requirements listed below.

Common Requirements

All projects must do the following, regardless of idea chosen:

  • All projects must incorporate Google user accounts as the primary way that someone logs into the system. You will need to use the Google account API to make this work. There are several libraries that are built for Django to work with Google accounts with tutorials.
  • You will have to create two different user access levels for each project. This will take a slightly different form with each project, but the basic idea is some users will be “common” users and some users will be “administrative” users. Users of one type should not be able to access features of the other type!
  • The two test accounts we will use will be: common user - cs3240.student@gmail.com and admin user - cs3240.super@gmail.com
  • All projects must incorporate the SIS API that we will provide information about.
  • All projects must be built using the prescribed language (Python 3), framework (Django 4), build environment (GitHub Actions CI), source control management (GitHub), and cloud hosting (Heroku). No exceptions to these will be granted.
  • You must use the PostgreSQL database engine for production on Heroku and continuous integration (on GitHub Actions). You are allowed to use SQLite for local testing so you do not have to install PostgreSQL on your own machine, but another option is to change your settings.py file point to the PostgreSQL DB on Heroku at all times.

Project Options

Here are the project options for Spring 2023! NOTE: These are the base requirements for your projects and are here to ensure that all three projects are of basically the same complexity. Projects that only complete these features will not earn much XP. You will add more use cases for both the student and admin users during your requirements elicitation activities.

Project Option 1: Schedule Advisor

In order to register for classes at UVA, a student must have their advisor sign off on their schedule. This app allows students to view courses for the upcoming semester, create a schedule, and then send it to an advisor for approval.

  • Students must be able to search classes by course mnemonic, course number, and course name.
  • Students must be able to add courses to a schedule, which will be saved with the student’s account.
  • A schedule cannot have courses that have a time conflict.
  • Students must be able to “submit” the schedule to an advisor to approve the schedule.
  • An advisor should see all schedules available for review upon login.
  • Any advisor should be able to approve or reject any schedule.
  • When a schedule is approved or rejected, the student should be able to see this when they login.

Project Option 2: Transfer Guide

It is always a challenge for students to know how courses from other universities will transfer to UVA. This app will allow administrators to list transfer equivalencies and for students to look up courses and request for more courses to be listed.

  • Students must be able to search for courses by university, course mnemonic, course number, and course name.
    • Example: a student should be able to search for all courses that transfer from NC State, all courses that are equivalent to UVA’s CS 3240, or all courses outside UVA that have the word “architecture” in them.
  • Students must be able to submit a request for a course to be evaluated by an administrator. When the course is submitted, it must contain basic information about the course, including a URL to the course’s home page.
  • Administrators must be able to add courses to the system beyond just approving course requests.
  • Any administrator should be able to approve or reject any course request.
  • Students should be able to see that their requests have been approved or rejected when they login.

Project Option 3: Tutor Me

Students are often looking for tutors for courses. This app will help facilitate this matching.

  • Tutors (this projects “administrator” user type) must be able to post the courses that they can tutor by searching through the set of courses by course mnemonic, course number, or course name.
  • Tutors can post their hourly rate and available time frames.
  • Students must be able to search for tutors by class, searching by course mnemonic, course number, or course name.
  • When a student finds a tutor they would like to work with, they must be able to submit a request for tutoring at a particular time. This time must fall within the tutor’s posted available time frames.
  • Tutors can then see their requests when they login. They can then approve or reject a tutoring session, which will show up on the student’s page when they login.

Team Roles

Each member of your five person team will take on one of these roles. Each role has different responsibilities, but ALL ROLES require that you be an active contributor to the code of the project. In other words, if you take on Scrum Master, that doesn’t mean you don’t have to contribute as much code as someone else.

Scrum Master - The Scrum Master could also be called the Team Leader, but it’s not really a “leader” position, per se, in that they are not making major decisions about the project itself. The Scrum Master is responsbile for keeping everyone on track, facilitating all team meetings, and monitoring team status / issues. The course staff will come to the Scrum Master first if there are any team issues or questions, and similarly the Scrum Master needs to know what’s going on with the team and can communicate with the staff if someone is falling behind, etc.

  • Reasons to be the Scrum Master: You like keeping schedules; you like keeping things organized; you don’t mind being the point of contact with the staff.
  • Reasons not to be the Scrum Master: You are not the most organized person; you don’t think you can stay on top of what the team is working on; you don’t like talking to the staff.

Major Artifact: Scrum Master Final Report, due at the end of the semester

Requirements Manager - The Requirements Manager is responsible for keeping up with “what” it is you are building. This person will spearhead the requirements elicitation process (which takes place in the first couple weeks of the project) as their major activity. Note that the Requirements Manager doesn’t do the whole process - they just lead the effort. Everyone else has to participate as well! Then throughout the semester they will update the burndown chart, monitoring the state of the project.

  • Reasons to be the Requirements Manager: You are interested in learning how requirements are created; you want to find out what your fellow stduents are excited about with your project; you like updating a spreadsheet; you like knowing “what’s coming next” in the project.
  • Reasons to not be the Requirements Manager: You have no interest in interacting with other people to find out what they want in a system; your first couple weeks of the semester are super hectic and you don’t have the time for the elicitation process.

Major Artifact: Requirements Elicitation Document , due within the first few weeks of the semester

Testing Manager - The Testing Manager is responsible for ensuring that the system is thoroughly tested, for developing the overall testing plan/philosophy of the team, and spearheading the beta testing effort at the end of the semester. The Testing Manager has two documents to create: the Test Plan and Beta Testing Document. The Test Plan is a short, two-page document that outlines what the testing philosophy of the team will be (i.e. every file must have X test cases, every person must write X tests, etc.). The Testing Manager then is responsible for overseeing that philosophy throughout the semester, ensuring unit tests are being written. Note that the Testing Manager does not write every test case in the system - they just keep up with what everyone else is doing and lend support as needed.

  • Reasons to be the Testing Manager: You want to learn more about testing procedures; you love seeing that unit test result bar turn green; you took HCI or something similar and are interested in setting up user testing.
  • Reasons not to be the Testing Manager: You don’t see the value in writing tests; you can’t stand the idea of having to write two documents (even if one is short); you don’t want to work with your fellow students in doing in-person testing.

Major Artifact: Beta Testing Report, due near the end of the semester

DevOps Manager - The DevOps Manager is the support tech for the team in a sense. They are responsbile for the management and support of all the systems we are using in the class, namely GitHub, GitHub Actions, and Heroku. They should be a person that is relatively comfortable tinkering with computers and settings. The DevOps Manager does not have to have all the answers, but would be the contact person for going to the staff to get help on any particular issues.

  • Reasons to be the DevOps Manager: You are familiar with the tools mentioned already, or you are really interested in learning more about them; you like to tinker with settings to get things working “just right”; you have the patience to help those on your team who might need assistance getting their environments working.
  • Reasons not to be the DevOps Manager: You do not feel comfortable helping others with technical issues; you are very unfamiliar with the tools above and would rather just have a “turnkey” solution for doing your work this semester.

Major Artifact: DevOps Report, due near the end of the semester

UX Designer - The UX (user experience) Designer is responsible for the overall look-and-feel of the project. They are responsible coming up with the design of the overall app and managing the styling on all pages (most likely with Bootstrap). This person would hopefully have the most HTML/CSS/JS experience of the team, but that is not necessarily required.

  • Reasons to be the UX Designer: You are familiar with HTML/CSS/JS and/or Bootstrap and you enjoy thinking about how you want people to interact with your application. You are a person who wants to make sure you turn in a “good looking” app.
  • Reasons not to be the UX Designer: You have absolutely no experience with web design and, in fact, you think Geocities pages from the late 90s was the peak of web design. For some fun examples, see https://www.cameronsworld.net/.

Major Artifact: Usability Assessment, due near the end of the semester

Artifact Document Templates

Team Documents

Project Management Spreadsheet
Sprint Report
Final Submission Pledge

Scrum Master

Scrum Master Final Report

Requirements Manager

Requirements Elicitation Document
Project Management Spreadsheet

Testing Manager

Beta Testing Report

DevOps Manager

DevOps Report

UX Designer

Usability Assessment

Sprint Information

For each sprint check, your team must meet the minimum requirements shown below for each sprint to earn full XP. Faculty will not override a TA’s decision except in extreme circumstances.

Each sprint is graded out of 25 XP. In general, the following grading standard applies:

  • 25 XP: Excellent progress toward completing the project on time and meeting all requirements.
  • 20 XP: Good progress toward completing the project, but at least one requirement looks a bit uncertain.
  • 15 XP: Fair progress toward completing the project, but team will need to step up to finish successfully.
  • 10 XP: Poor progress toward completing the project and the team definitely needs to refocus. Some measurable work was accomplished, however.
  • 5 XP: Little progress was made toward completing the project during this sprint.
  • 0 XP: Project is in danger.

Sprint 1: Project Organization

Due: February 5 or 6

Goal: Have your initial meeting as a team and determine who will be doing what on the team. This meeting can be any time between when your team is formed and your sprint check meeting with your TA on either February 5 or 6. The Scrum Master of each team MUST complete this form with the team as a part of the Sprint: Team Declaration Form. Also, Scrum Masters should initialize the team GitHub repo through GitHub Classroom. Please use your assigned team number for the identifier when prompted (e.g. A-03). Other team members can then go to that link and accept the assignment, selecting the proper team.

Requirements: Complete the Team Declaration form above ASAP. Initialize your GitHub repo and have all team members join.

Team Evals: No Team Evals this week.

How To Submit: Scrum Masters should fill out a Sprint Report and submit it to Gradescope BEFORE meeting with your TA so they can reference it. Scrum Masters must select their team members in Gradescope when submitting so all members will earn the XP for the sprint. (No, you won’t have much to report this week, but think about what’s coming up and discuss that.)

Sprint 2: Requirements Elicitation

Due: February 12 or 13

Goal: Spend most of this sprint working as a team to elicit the full requirements for your system. Note that while the final Requirements Document is the responsibility of the Requirements Manager, ALL TEAM MEMBERS are expected to contribute to gathering and refining the final set of requirements. Some coding can be performed if desired, such as some design work or starting on Google Account integration. For the project code itself, create a base Django project, put the code in GitHub, and have it hosted on Heroku. Basically, you’re taking the lessons you learned from the setup of the Django Practice Assessment and putting it to use here to show that you have a working foundation to build off of.

Requirements: The team must have a working basic Django app hosted on Heroku. The team can also show and discuss the progress and initial results of their requirements elicitation activity. The team does not need to have a finalized requirements document at this point, but must be able to show that they have started the elicitation process and have at least some data. The Requirements Manager will receive a separate score for the actual document. Also, teams should be able to discuss ideas for the design of their application.

Team Evals: At the end of Sprints 2-6 and at the end of the semester, you will need to fill out an evaluation for each member of your team! You can find the evaluation form here: Student Team Sprint Evaluations

How To Submit: Scrum Masters should fill out a Sprint Report and submit it to Gradescope BEFORE meeting with your TA so they can reference it. Scrum Masters must select their team members in Gradescope when submitting so all members will earn the XP for the sprint. The main branch of your GitHub repo should be live on Heroku.

Sprint 3: Login Integration

Due: February 26 or 27

Goal: All projects must have a user account feature for students to login with. To accomplish this, you are to integrate Google login to your app.

Requirements: A user with a Google Account (not just a Netbadge account!) can login to the system and the system shows in some way that that user has indeed logged in. You should not lock your app to just @virginia.edu accounts. You must show that both a regular student account and an admin account can login and that they get different screens.

Team Evals: At the end of Sprints 2-6 and at the end of the semester, you will need to fill out an evaluation for each member of your team! You can find the evaluation form here: Student Team Sprint Evaluations

How To Submit: Scrum Masters should fill out a Sprint Report and submit it to Gradescope BEFORE meeting with your TA so they can reference it. Scrum Masters must select their team members in Gradescope when submitting so all members will earn the XP for the sprint. The main branch of your GitHub repo should be live on Heroku.

Sprint 4: API Integration + Major Feature

Due: March 19 or 20

Goal: All projects must make use of the SIS API for reading information about classes. For this sprint, create the infrastructure for doing this, showing that you can read information and display it to the screen in a meaningful way in the context of your app (i.e. not just dumping it on the screen). You also must show that you have some form of search working.

Requirements: In the opinion of the TA, significant work was accomplished this week utilizing the SIS API, such that it is visible and mostly usable in the system. GitHub Actions CI MUST be operational with at least multiple test cases in order to earn full XP. As you are just getting started with testing, this is more showing us that you have the process setup and that you have some passing tests.

Team Evals: At the end of Sprints 2-6 and at the end of the semester, you will need to fill out an evaluation for each member of your team! You can find the evaluation form here: Student Team Sprint Evaluations

How To Submit: Scrum Masters should fill out a Sprint Report and submit it to Gradescope BEFORE meeting with your TA so they can reference it. Scrum Masters must select their team members in Gradescope when submitting so all members will earn the XP for the sprint. The main branch of your GitHub repo should be live on Heroku.

Sprint 5: Next Major Feature

Due: April 2 or 3

Goal: Move forward with the next major features of your application, showing that you are making significant progress. Your app should be “functional” at this point, such that a user can login and use some of the basic features.

Requirements: In the opinion of the TA, significant work was accomplished this week other major features of the application, such that it is visible and mostly usable in the system. GitHub Actions should still be working.

Team Evals: At the end of Sprints 2-6 and at the end of the semester, you will need to fill out an evaluation for each member of your team! You can find the evaluation form here: Student Team Sprint Evaluations

How To Submit: Scrum Masters should fill out a Sprint Report and submit it to Gradescope BEFORE meeting with your TA so they can reference it. Scrum Masters must select their team members in Gradescope when submitting so all members will earn the XP for the sprint. The main branch of your GitHub repo should be live on Heroku.

Sprint 6: Beta Version

Due: April 16 or 17

Goal: After Sprint 6 is complete, you are going to have other students test your system. So you need a working system with most all of your functionality ready to go. The app may not be fully polished and still needs a bit of work, but it needs to be usable from beginning to end.

Requirments and Full Beta Version: In the opinion of the TA, you have an app that is ready for other students to test out (e.g. it doesn’t crash, it looks reasonably good, it has most features, etc.). You will earn 25 XP for the sprint check plus 100 XP as the first half of your overall project score of 250 XP (basically, if you have a working app at this point, we know your final project grade will be at least 100/250 XP, so we can give you those points now).

Team Evals: At the end of Sprints 2-6 and at the end of the semester, you will need to fill out an evaluation for each member of your team! You can find the evaluation form here: Student Team Sprint Evaluations

How To Submit: Scrum Masters should fill out a Sprint Report and submit it to Gradescope BEFORE meeting with your TA so they can reference it. Scrum Masters must select their team members in Gradescope when submitting so all members will earn the XP for the sprint. The main branch of your GitHub repo should be live on Heroku.

Final Grading Information

The final project is worth a total of 250 XP. (100 XP will be awarded after Sprint 6 for your Beta version and the remaining 150 XP will be awarded by the professors after final demos.) Like the other assessments in this course, grading is overall wholistic - that is, there is no specific point-for-point breakdown for the rubric. One reason for this is that this is simply not how software is delivered in real-life. There are basically only four outcomes:

  • You meet the expectations of the customer within reason and both parties are satisfied with the outcome;
  • You exceed the expectations of the customer, potentially generating more good will, a good reference, or more future business;
  • You do not quite meet the expectations of the customer, leaving some room for improvement;
  • You ship a system that simply does not work to the expectations of the customer.

We will grade your projects in a similar vein, with some flexibility for minor adjustments.

Thus, the grading levels will be:

  • Above and Beyond - Min XP: 250 / Max XP: 255
  • Complete - Min XP: 200 / Max XP: 250
  • Lacking - Min XP: 150 / Max XP: 200
  • Insufficient - Min XP: 0 / Max XP: 150

Aspects that will determine the exact grade within a range include but are not limited to:

  • UI design
  • Overall flow of application
  • Special features
  • Obvious bugs that should have been corrected
  • Polish

Final Team Evals: All team members will complete a final, overall team evaluation at the end of the course. Final Student Team Sprint Evaluations

The final version of the project must be in GitHub and hosted on Heroku no later than 11:59 PM on Tuesday May 2!